Project Management Experience

Project Manager, Caterpillar’s Development & Learning Center, Panama

Overall responsibility for CM team providing consulting services on commercial building installations from planning and design phase through final project closeout. Oversight of budgets and project controls systems, bid and award of subcontracts, procurement, prepare strategies for procurement and phasing, quality control.  Managed installation of systems and transition to turn-over and occupancy.

Senior Project Manager, Projects, US Government and US Navy Facility Engineering Commands

Managed a US. Navy project to complete technical data surveys for two US Navy Facility Engineering Commands (FECs) in the US. Extensive documentation and reporting were required   for the coordination and compilation of data into a formal technical document to the client. Project responsibilities included proposal management for CONUS and OCONUS projects.  Managed the efforts to set up project reporting, including the project execution plan for an $800M multi-year program management contract for the U.S. Government.

Senior Project Manager, Wyeth Pharmaceutical Expansion, Canada

Responsibilities included the procurement and construction activities required for a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility expansion. Project required integration of a new expansion into the existing facility.

Senior Project Manager, Gorman Rupp Industries Phase 2, Mansfield, OH

Responsible for the design, procurement and construction for a 450,000 square foot manufacturing complex. Established project mobilization, budget, and procurement of subcontract services; outlined permitting requirements to allow environmental applications through the U.S. Government, State of Ohio and the City of Mansfield to proceed.

Senior Project Manager, U.S. Dept. of Defense, Iraq/Kuwait

Responsible for design/build projects completed for the U.S. Military in Iraq and Kuwait under cost-reimbursable and firm-fixed-price contracts.  Projects were of large-scale industrial types, and were executed under difficult circumstances that ranged from high voltage transmission lines to sweet water canal and pumping station refurbishment, medium voltage distribution systems including substations, dam repair and underground sanitary repairs. Specific projects included:

  • 400kV 260-KM long high voltage transmission line repair, Baiji/Baghdad, start to finish fast track project directly managed to successful repair and energizing;
  • Sadr City underground sanitary sewer repair, deep point repairs up to 6 to 8-meters deep, high pressure jetting of large diameter UG pipe;
  • Basra Sweet water canal repair, 220KM long with two lift stations, 8 cubic meters per second flow, deep excavations for embankment repair, complete rework of standby power, 1 cubic meter per second pump rebuild, etc.
  • Adhaim Dam; assessment of existing incomplete project, completed engineering study to determine stability and work required to complete the project;
  • Diyala Governate medium voltage electrical distribution system including substations;
  • Kuwait/Iraq Border Crossing Facility, design/build firm fixed price fast track directly managed from start to finish, on time and under budget. Extreme conditions in remote location.

Project Manager, LSP Organization, Bronx, NY

Managed subcontract work required to expedite construction at a health care facility.  Priced changes initiated by the owner or required due to field conditions, maintained close coordination with the owner, and conducted negotiations with the subcontractors.

Regional Operations/Project Manager, Lucent Technologies, Delco Electronics, Johnson Controls, General Electric, General Motors

Overall responsibility for design/build projects (for Lucent, Avaya and Global Crossings) in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Egypt, Mexico, Venezuela, and the US.  Work involved design and construction of facilities for manufacturing, corporate offices, warehousing, etc.  Projects were executed under fixed-price and cost-reimbursable contracts.  Responded to clients’ demands and expectations, ISO 9001 compliance requirements, reporting, etc.

Project Management

Typically, a project manager will have more authority and responsibility than a construction manager. While a construction manager is dealing with personnel and materials at the work site, as well as making sure the project is compliant with code and best building practices.

Then there are program managers. They are like project managers, only their responsibilities go beyond one project. A program manager is managing a portfolio of usually related projects, which has its own unique requirements.

There is a long list of what roles a project manager is responsible for over the life cycle of a project. These responsibilities, give or take depending on the organization and project, are universal. They apply to all project managers.

  • Planning Project Resources: A project can begin and certainly is designed to fail if there first wasn’t a plan devised to see it through, on time and within budget. The project manager’s first role is making a feasible plan that achieves the goals and objectives of the project and aligns with the organization’s overall business strategy. This is not only a blueprint with which to run the project, but a critical part of the pitch to get approval for the project. Part of the plan is defining the project’s scope and determining what resources are available, estimating time and financial commitment, as well as how to monitor and report on the project’s progress.
  • Assembling and Leading Project Team: Project managers need resources to complete the project tasks, which includes skilled and experienced workers. They need to either take a leadership role with an existing team or create one. Once a team is created, you assign them tasks and deadlines, give them the tools to collaborate and don’t get in their way by micromanaging every activity. Meet regularly, of course, and get status updates to chart their progress, while reallocated resources as needed to avoid blocking team members or overburdening them.
  • Time Management: Time is always ticking towards the project deadline. While communications is key to addresses changes and make sure everyone is doing what they need to do when they need to do it, the project manager must also define, schedule and accurately estimate the task duration to develop and maintain a realistic schedule.
  • Budget: Nothing is going to get done without money. Figuring out what the proper funding for the project is, having that get accepted and then keeping the project within or under that figure is often what makes or breaks a project. You can get your stakeholder their deliverables on time, but if that cost more than the budget you created, then the project is a failure. Making an accurate estimate is only the first part. Next, you must monitor the actual spend as compared to the planned budget. If those figures are off, you must adjust accordingly.
  • Quality and Satisfaction: These are two major hurdles to clear. You want to deliver to your stakeholders what they expected or better and make sure that they’re satisfied with the results. But that doesn’t mean ignoring them to focus solely on the project. Rather, you need to be in constant communications with them, reporting on progress and being open to their feedback to keep them happy and coming back to you with future projects.
  • Manage Issues and Risk: Problems will inevitably arise in a project. That’s called an issue. You need to be ready for them and work towards resolving them quickly, so as they don’t take your project off-track. Then there are risks, which are potential problems, ones that have yet to occur or might not ever. Regardless, you must figure out beforehand what the risks are and set in place a plan of action if they in fact occur.
  • Monitoring Progress: To make sure a project is progressing as planned, you must constantly measure it and compare those metrics against the plan you created. Therefore, you must have a way to collect project data, such as status reports from your team, to see if the actual progress of the project is meeting what you had initially planned. Things are going to change along the way, and you’re going to have to adjust or reallocate resources to accommodate these changes. If you’re not monitoring this, you’re managing in the dark.
  • Reporting and Documentation: Reporting is one of ways you communicate with your team and stakeholders. While teams need more detailed information and stakeholders are looking for broader data to check the project’s progress, both are essential tasks for the project manager. This documentation, along with all paperwork, must be collected, signed off on and archived by the end of a project, which provides a history that you can revisit when planning for a similar project in the future.